enable-vpn

setup VPN (Virtual Private Network) connection in Ubuntu 12.04/12.10

VPN (Virtual Private Network) connections are great for those who want higher degree of security on the Internet. All of your web traffic will be encrypted. So even if you’re browsing a non-ssl website – your information (e.g login details) is always safe with VPN.

So even if you’re just a web surfer or a heavy torrent downloader you can try VPN to save yourself from the common spy (your ISPs and goverment) and it will also allow you to bypass geographical restrictions (it means if you use a US based VPN then you can browse CBS or Hulu videos from anywhere in the world).

Which VPN provider to choose ?

There are lot of VPN providers, I recommend Private Internet Access (I’m using it – and it’s working great) – it’s good and costs only few bucks a month. If you’re using other VPN provider then you may have to adjust few things according to their recommendation.

Setting up VPN on Ubuntu / Linux Mint

step 1. Go to Network settings and create a new interface for your network – select VPN.

network-settings

Then a new dialog will appear to select the interface type – select VPN .

New Interface - VPN

step 2. Then select the VPN type – choose PPTP (Point to Point Tunneling Protocol).

vpn-connection-type

step 3. Now – add your VPN account details (gateway, there are various gateway you can choose from here is the list of gateways).

vpn-provider - details

step 4. After adding some basic details for your VPN provider, go to advanced settings and enable MPPE.

vpn-enable-ppe

 

step 5. Now – enable VPN and enjoy the higher degree of security :)

That’s all, your VPN setup is done and you can switch between vpn or direct access – just in single click.

Note: using vpn may slow down your browsing experience, it’s not recommended when your connection speed is too slow.

qt-logo

Qt 5 is released!

qt-logo

Qt Framework v 5 is released! Qt is a popular cross-platform application development framework (free and open source, available under GNU LGPL). If you have used KDE desktop environment then you’ve already used a lot of applications built upon it (as KDE desktop heavily relies on Qt).

The new version of Qt (v 5.0) has lot of exciting features (it’s a major released, after a long time – the v 4.0 was released, around 7 years ago).

What’s new in Qt 5.0 ?

  • amazing graphics capabilities and performance
  • Qt quick
  • Modularized Qt Libraries
  • Improved multimedia stuffs
  • Qt platform abstraction
  • JSON support
  • Webkit and HTML 5
  • Read more on Qt 5 features!

Download Qt 5

Linux LOGO

Linux Kernel 3.7 released!

Linux Kernel v3.7 is released (official announcement). The most exciting thing in this release is probably the support for ARM 64 bit architectures.

Linux LOGO

What’s New in Linux (Kernel) 3.7 ?

  • ARM Multiplatform support
  • ARM 64 bit support
  • signed kernel modules
  • updated btrfs
  • adds vxlan (virtual extensible LAN tunneling protocol)
  • SMB v2 protocol support (experimental)
  • supports TCP fast Open (on server side)
  • parallel NFS support

Read about the latest changes/features in more details.

ninja-ide

Ninja IDE – Cool IDE for Python/Django Developers

What is Ninja IDE ?
Ninja-IDE stands for Ninja is not just another IDE. It’s specially designed for Python developers. So, if you’re a python programmer, developing some desktop apps or web apps (probably, with Django framework), you must give it a try. It’s a simple, lightweight and fast IDE (not a bloated one – as you would usually think of an IDE). It’s available for all common platforms like Ubuntu or any GNU/Linux distro, Windows or Mac etc, as a free software (GPL).

ninja-ide

Features

  • simplicity (it’s simple to use)
  • speed (it’s fast)
  • plugins for additional features (git integration, django development etc)
  • cross platform (available for all common platforms)

Installing Ninja IDE in Ubuntu (12.04/12.10)

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:ninja-ide-developers/daily
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install ninja-ide

For Other GNU/Linux distributions (or other OS) you can download from the official page.