Tag Archives: quantal


How to Install Nginx web server on Ubuntu 12.04/12.10

Nginx is a lightweight web server (HTTP, SMTP, IMAP, POP3 ..). It has very low memory footprints with higher degree of concurrency. It’s a free and open source software, runs on all major OS (Unix, Linux, BSD, Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows and more).


Setup Nginx on Ubuntu (12.04) LTS Server

Nginx is already available in Ubuntu repository, but it’s very outdated (it may be ok for development or testing but not for deployment) so for production environment you should install the newer version – either from the source or PPA.

1. Update

sudo apt-get -y update
sudo apt-get -y upgrade

2. Dependencies

For adding ppa you need to install the python-software-properties package.

sudo apt-get -y install python-software-properties

3. Install nginx

sudo apt-add-repository -y ppa:nginx/stable
sudo apt-get -y update
sudo apt-get -y install nginx

4. Start the server!

sudo service nginx start

Now, move on to the address (IP address of your VPS or the domain name or the localhost(in case of development environment)). You should see the default page served by nginx.

5. setup server configs

For editing file over the ssh, you can use a command line editor such as Vi or Nano. I recommend nano if you want a text editor without any learning curve.

Install Nano, a lightweight text editor

sudo apt-get -y install nano

Then create a server configuration file for your app/site. (you could also just edit the global config(/etc/nginx/nginx.conf), it’s fine if you’ve only one app/site running on a virtual private server but if you plan to deploy multiple apps/websites to a single VPS – then you should create seperate configs for each website)

sudo nano /etc/nginx/sites-available/example.com

After creating the config file (if you don’t know how – then read the official tutorials), create a symlink

sudo ln -nfs /etc/nginx/sites-available/example.com  /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/example.com

Now, restart the server!

sudo service nginx restart

Lightweight Desktop Environments for Ubuntu 12.10/12.04

If you’re not happy with the default desktop environment (Unity shell on GNOME3) in Ubuntu 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal), then you can try installing some alternative desktop such as MATE, Cinnamon, KDE etc or a lightweight desktop environment such as XFCE.

Why go for a Lightweight Desktop Environment ?

  • speed
  • efficiency
  • low resource requirements (it can also run smooth on older computers)


XFCE is a simple and easy to use Desktop environment with traditional layout/conventions (much like GNOME 2). The XFCE package contains desktop and some lightweight apps such as Thunar(File Manager), Ristretto (Image viewer), Midori (Web Browser), Orage (calandar app) etc. Based on XFCE, there is a seperate edition of Ubuntu – called Xubuntu.

Xfce Desktop

Installing XFCE Desktop in Ubuntu 12.10

sudo apt-get install xfce4


LXDE is another lighteweight desktop environment. LXDE package includes the desktop environment and apps such as PCMan(File Manager), Leafpad (Text Editor), LXTerminal (Terminal Emulator), Openbox (Window Manager) etc. LXDE flavor of Ubuntu is Lubuntu.


Installing LXDE Desktop in Ubuntu 12.10

sudo apt-get install lxde

3. Fluxbox

Fluxbox is a highly configurable lightweight desktop environment, written in C++.


Installing FLuxbox Desktop in Ubuntu 12.10/12.04

sudo apt-get install fluxbox

4. GNOME Classic

GNOME classic edition (gnome session fallback) is based on GNOME3 but it has look and behavior very similar to GNOME2. So GNOME2 fans may want to try this.


Installing GNOME classic Desktop in Ubuntu 12.10

sudo apt-get install gnome-session-fallback
sudo apt-get install indicator-applet-appmenu
Google Chrome : Ubuntu 12.10

Google Chrome for Ubuntu 12.10 “Quantal Quetzal”

Ubuntu 12.10 comes with Mozilla Firefox by default, it’s a great browser! but if you want a secondary web browser (or you like Google Chrome) then can also try Chromium (the open source project upon which Google chrome is based on) – it’s available there in Ubuntu Software Center, but you won’t get some chrome specific features such as in built flash player etc. (but you can install that separately if you want, by installing ubuntu-restricted-extras package, refer few things to do after installing ubuntu 12.10)

Google Chrome : Ubuntu 12.10

Installing Gdebi Package Installer (Optional)

sudo apt-get install gdebi

Installing Google Chrome

  • Download Google Chrome
  • Open the downloaded file with Gdebi Package Installer or ubuntu software center (but it may cause some dependency errors, in that case you will have to manually install the missing dependencies or execute sudo apt-get install -f), in case if you haven’t already installed the Gdebi package installer (which is a lightweight program for managing *.deb packages)

How to Install KDE Desktop Environment in Ubuntu 12.10

Ubuntu 12.10 comes with Unity Desktop environment/shell (based on GNOME 3). A lot of users love unity, they like the cools features of unity (Unity dash, lens, launcher etc) , but there are lots of haters too. Fortunately, there are many options available – Gnome shell, KDE, XFCE, MATE, Cinnamon, etc.

KDE – Desktop Environment

KDE is one of the most popular and a classic desktop environment. It’s easy to use and it has lot of cools apps (somewhat like Gnome), specially for newbies (moving from Windows XP/7/8).


In Ubuntu 12.10, it’s there in package repository, by default. KDE plasma desktop and apps are bundled together in various ways. Choose something that suits you well, or just go with second one (kde-plasma-desktop, with minimal set of applications).

KDE standard

it contains KDE plasma desktop and standard set of applications such as Kate (default editor, like gedit), Konqueror (default web browser), Kget (Download Manager), KMail (email client), Dolphin (File Manager), Konsole (terminal) etc. To install standard package of kde, open a terminal and execute the command –

sudo apt-get install kde-standard

KDE Desktop Minimal

If you just want to give it a try or may be you don’t want the applications to be installed by default (you can always install later), then prefer this minimal package – that installs KDE plasma desktop with minimal set of apps.

sudo apt-get install kde-plasma-desktop

KDE Netbook Minimal

As the name suggest, it’s more suitable for netbook users.

sudo apt-get install kde-plasma-netbook

KDE Full

If you want the complete package of apps, along with the core desktop environment (KDE Plasma), then it’s the best option for you (but it may take more time to install depending on your internet speed).

sudo apt-get install kde-full

That’s All, enjoy the cool charming look of KDE.

upgrading to Ubuntu 12.10

How to upgrade to Ubuntu 12.10 from 12.04

Ubuntu 12.10 “Quantal Quetzal”  has released, with a lot of new exciting features. So you’re running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS now, and you’re interested in the shinny features of 12.10, then you may want to upgrade now (or you can do a fresh install (12.10), in another partition/drive)

Upgrading to Ubuntu 12.10, from 12.04 LTS is very easy, but you must always have a backup of all your important data (to another hard disk or online such as Dropbox, Ubuntu One or Amazon S3).

First of all, Back up all your important data

Then, start Update Manager. Update the settings, so that it can notify you about the new version (by default it’s set for LTS only).


Now, restart the update manager and click on check to reload the package information. Now you should see the upgrade notification “New Ubuntu release 12.10 is available” at top.

upgrading to Ubuntu 12.10


Now, read the release notes and click on upgrade to start the upgrade process.


It may take time depending on your internet connection, once the process is complete, restart your computer and enjoy the cool features in latest Ubuntu release (12.10).

NOTE : If you prefer a solid and stable distribution over the new one with latest cool stuffs, then better stick with LTS version, specially in production environment or any situation where stability/compatibility is critically important. e.g in server environment. But for most of the desktop users, that might not be an issue, or you could run LTS as primary OS (for work) and the latest one as secondary OS in other partition/drive.