Category Archives: Browsers

What is DNS Prefetching ?

As the name suggests, DNS Prefetching is the process of resolving domain names, in advance.

Suppose a user is reading a web page, he(or she) may or may not visit a link, referenced on that web page but if he(or she) does, the next page can be loaded a lot faster if  it uses DNS prefetching – because it won’t have any delay due to DNS lookup (which may takes up few milliseconds to a second or more, depending on lots of factors such as latency and whether the result is locally cached or not).

How to implement it ?

To add DNS prefetching to your website, just add an extra link tag (in head, of course), in the following format :

<link rel="dns-prefetch" href="">

You can also control DNS prefetching at page level, using the meta tag (off means no prefetching, change it to on to enable it) :

<meta http-equiv="x-dns-prefetch-control" content="off">

Does any browser support it ?

Mozilla Firefox and Chromium/Google Chrome certainly supports this feature (with compatible syntax, the above style works well for both browsers), I’m not sure about other browsers. (I think Safari and Opera do, but you need to make sure)

Ref :


Firefox 22 is released!

Mozilla Firefox v 22 is out! Checkout the release notes for more info. It has come with lots of new features/improvements such as support for new HTML5 elements, improved WebGL performance, new APIs for web notifications, security fixes and more!


What’s new in Firefox 22 ?

  • WebRTC enabled by default
  • you can control HTML5 audio or video playback rate
  • asm.js is optimized for better performance
  • built in font inspector
  • CSS3Flexbox enabled by default
  • new HTML5 elements (date and time)


Ubuntu/Linux Mint users can update the firefox through the regular update, using Update Manager or terminal –

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade

So, try out the latest version of firefox and share your experience . :-)


Top 10 Firefox add-ons for web developers

Mozilla Firefox has some cool developer tools (Style Editor, Scratchpad, Debugger, Responsive Design View, Inspect(3D view) and more) by default, but you can further extend them with some of the great add-ons/extensions listed here.

1. Firebug

Firebug has lot of useful features (edit, debug, monitor your code in live mode) that makes web development much easier. It’s a must have add-on for web developers.

Download Firebug

2. Rainbow Color Tools

it provides a bunch of color tools for web development – easy to use color picker, color library, inspector, analyzer(to analyze the color scheme of a website)etc.

Download Rainbow Color Tools

3. Wappalyzer

It tells you about the softwares(libraries, frameworks, server etc) used by a website.

Download Wappalyzer

4. ShowIP

It shows the IP address of the website, in status bar; additionally, you can also query whois, hostname, netcraft etc.

Download ShowIP

5. fontinfo

It’s good for exploring the fonts used on a website (with the font panel or show fonts section in right click menu)

Download fontinfo

6. Web Developer

add some cool web development tools.

Download Web Developer

7. User Agent Switcher

Using this extension, you can easily switch the user agent of the browser.

Download User Agent Switcher

8. Greasmonkey

To customize the web page (how it behaves or displays content), using small bits of javascript.

Download Greasmonkey

9. Modify Headers

To modify the http request headers sent to servers.

Download Modify Headers

10. FireFTP

It’s a cross-platform FTP/SFTP client for Mozilla Firefox.

Download FireFTP

Google Chrome : Ubuntu 12.10

Google Chrome for Ubuntu 12.10 “Quantal Quetzal”

Ubuntu 12.10 comes with Mozilla Firefox by default, it’s a great browser! but if you want a secondary web browser (or you like Google Chrome) then can also try Chromium (the open source project upon which Google chrome is based on) – it’s available there in Ubuntu Software Center, but you won’t get some chrome specific features such as in built flash player etc. (but you can install that separately if you want, by installing ubuntu-restricted-extras package, refer few things to do after installing ubuntu 12.10)

Google Chrome : Ubuntu 12.10

Installing Gdebi Package Installer (Optional)

sudo apt-get install gdebi

Installing Google Chrome

  • Download Google Chrome
  • Open the downloaded file with Gdebi Package Installer or ubuntu software center (but it may cause some dependency errors, in that case you will have to manually install the missing dependencies or execute sudo apt-get install -f), in case if you haven’t already installed the Gdebi package installer (which is a lightweight program for managing *.deb packages)

Update Firefox to v 15 in Ubuntu [12.04] / Linux Mint [13]

Firefox 15 is available, with a lot of cool new features and improvements, specially related to 3D performance (compressed textures for better performance, with WebGL) and better memory usage for plugins/add-ons (optimized memory use! vow!!! that’s really a great improvement, memory hungry add-ons makes browsing slow and painful sometimes).

Some of the new features/improvements are –firefox-logo

  • silent, background updates
  • support for SPDY v2
  • WebGL enhancements
  • html 5 related improvemens (native support for Opus, audio/video elements etc)
  • available in a new Local language – Maithili (it’s my native language :) )

Updating to Firefox 15

In Ubuntu 12.04 or similar distributions such as Linux Mint, you can get the latest version of firefox – with a normal update. So you don’t need to add any external PPA or download/install it manually, unless you also want to try beta versions or daily builds. So just open the Update Manager and click on Install Updates to update all programs (recommended) or just select the Firefox browser from the list and update.

To update Firefox from Terminal, just execute the commands –

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install firefox

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