Category Archives: Linux

GNOME Sudoku : A desktop Sudoku puzzle game app for Ubuntu

I guess, you’ve heard of sudoku before or have solved any sudoku puzzle at some point of time in your life. Sudoku is one of the most popular number-puzzle game, which was originated in Japan. Probably, it’s the best tool to overcome boredom, specially, when you have nothing much around to do in your home, office or school. You can find Sudoku puzzles in your newspapers, magazines, websites (just Google it) and mobile app stores.

In sudoku puzzle, you are provided with incomplete 9×9 grid (9 rows & 9 columns). Your goal is to fill the empty grids with digits keeping in mind that each row, column and 3×3 section contains numbers only from 1 to 9 with each number used only once in each section.

GNOME Sudoku

For Ubuntu (Linux Mint) users like us, who wants to play sudoku puzzle on desktop can install an app called Gnome Sudoku. Gnome Sudoku is an open-source program and was written in Python.

Features

It’s lightweight, handy and has very simple interface. It comes with easy, medium, hard and very-hard difficulty levels which makes the Sudoku solving even more challenging. While solving the puzzle, the games are automatically saved so you don’t have to worry about saving them. It reloads the last unfinished game when you restart the application. Beside that, you can also create your own 9×9 sudoku puzzle and save the board into PDF file formats for printing.

sudoku

To install Gnome-Sudoku in Ubuntu system, open the terminal and run the following command :

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install gnome-sudoku

 
When you’re done installation, go ahead and launch the app. Next, just select the difficulty level and start solving the puzzle. It’s not going to be easy every-time, just keep trying.

Note : It’s a guest post by Mr. Ambuj Kumar. You should also checkout his recent website http://anysudokusolver.com. It’s an online sudoku solver, And very handy when you are stuck.

KeePassX – The Best Password Manager for Ubuntu/Linux

KeePassX is a cross-platform password manager application. It has very high security standards. Since, it stores data locally in encrypted format, it’s probably a better alternative to any online password manager. If you want to share it across multiple devices/platforms just sync the database file using some apps like Dropbox. Make sure you’re synchronizing the encrypted file(*.kdb), not the raw *.xml export or anything else.

add password keepassx

It has simple and lightweight graphical interface, with all the basic features, to make password management easier for everyone. It comes in very handy if you manage lots of online accounts at various sites, because having a unique and strong password for each website is highly recommended. With KeePassX, the Master Password is all you need to remember.

Installing/Setting up KeePassX on Ubuntu [14.04 LTS]

It’s very likely (in most common GNU/Linux distributions – Debian, Ubuntu, Linux Mint etc) that it’s already there in your default package repository. Just open a terminal (default shortcut : Ctrl+Alt+t) and type

sudo apt-get install keepassx

After installing KeePassX, set up the Master Password or Key. And you should also configure/specify the location for storing the database file. KeePassX will prompt you to enter the master key every time you open the application. Keep a very long Master password (I use 22 letters with lower & upper case letters, numbers and special characters) and remember that. On the other hand, you could also use key pairs instead of password. (or both if you wish)

Additional features include a random password generator, storing urls, comments, usernames, attachments etc in a simple and easy way. Passwords can be easily organized in multiple groups and unique icons can be specified for each group.

Visit the official site to know more about the features (or to get package for other distro) and drop a comment here if you’ve any question/issue related to KeePassX.

Monitor your bandwidth usage with vnstat [Ubuntu/Linux]

vnstat is a simple command line utility for monitoring bandwidth usage in Ubuntu or any other Linux based distributions and BSD. It’s a very handy tool for keeping an eye on overall bandwidth usage on your system, especially if you’re accessing web over mobile network or you’re using ISP that reduces speed after a certain limit e.g 50 GB (FUP).

vnstat

Features

  • very lightweight and efficient (low cpu usage regardless of traffic)
  • simple and easy to use (no configuration required)
  • it can monitor multiple interfaces simultaneously
  • multiple output options (daily, monthly etc)

Installing vnstat in Ubuntu/Linux

It’s already there in official package repository, all you need to do is open a terminal and type :

sudo apt-get install vnstat

As you install vnstat, it will start monitoring your internet traffic (default interface : eth0). Simply type vnstat to get an overview of actual bandwidth usage and the estimated usage for next day or month. It will also display the interface(s) it’s monitoring.

vnstat

For all available options, type :

vnstat --help

Few commands you should know

  • vnstat -d : for daily stats
  • vnstat -w : for weekly stats
  • vnstat -m : for monthly stats
  • vnstat -l : for analyzing live traffic
  • vnstat -t : shows usage statistics for top 10 days

Fish – A user friendly command line shell for Ubuntu/Linux

Fish is a friendly command line shell for Ubuntu/Linux, Mac or any other operating system from the *nix family. If you use bash (the default shell in Ubuntu) often, then you may want to give it a try. It has lots of smart features you may find productive.

fish shell

Features

  • Autosuggestions – It suggests commands when you type, based on history and it’ll often save you some time with the commands you type more often.
  • Scripting – Similar to bash but the syntax is much simple, clean and consistent.
  • term256 – it supports 256 colors.
  • Sane defaults – Most of the features will work just fine without any additional configurations.

Installing Fish in Ubuntu

Fish is already there in official package repository (tested on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS). So, you can install it right away

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install fish

If it’s not available in repository or you’re using other Linux distribution ? Check out official page to download a tarball for your distribution.

To start fish, simply type fish on your terminal and you’ll jump into the fish shell. Type help and it will open the documentation tab (hosted locally) in your default browser. Also read official tutorials to learn more about the features of Fish Shell.

Getting started with Android Studio on Ubuntu/Linux (14.04 LTS)

Android Studio is the new development environment for Android (officially recommended). It’s based on IntelliJ IDEA (Integrated Development Environment from JetBRAINS).

android studio

You can still use Eclipse IDE though (however, it may not be supported once the Android Studio comes out of beta) but Android Studio brings lots of new features and improvements (Advanced Android code completion and refactoring, multiple APK generation, Maven based build dependencies etc), so lets set up Android Studio on Ubuntu/Linux. (tested on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (64 bit Intel Machine))

1. Install JDK 6 or later

First, install Oracle JDK 8 (although you could also choose OpenJDK but it has some UI/performance issues) using WebUpd8 PPA.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-installer
sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-set-default

To make sure, it’s installed successfully, open a terminal and type (you should get the version number of the jdk you’ve installed e.g javac 1.8.0_11)

javac -version

2. Download and install Android Studio

Download the Android Studio package for Linux and extract it somewhere (e.g home directory).
Then type :

cd android-studio/bin
./studio.sh

3. Install SDK Platforms

You need to install some SDK before you jump into building android apps. Click on Configure -> SDK Manager to open Android SDK Manager. Select the latest API (to test against target build, e.g API 19 (Android 4.4.2)) and some packages in Extras (Android Support Library and Android Support Repository). Then install the selected packages.

That’s all. Now, the development environment is ready :-)
If you need some help then learn Android development at TreeHouse or checkout official docs.