Category Archives: Linux


Getting Started with Play Framework : Ubuntu/Linux Mint

What is Play Framework ?

Play Framework is a simple and powerful web development framework for Java/Scala. It’s very inspired from Ruby On Rails framework, so it’s like Rails, but for Java/Scala (initially it supported only Java, but now it also supports Scala (a programming language, very similar to Java, with some functional features, designed to be as a better Java)). Unlike other complicated java web development frameworks, Play is very simple and highly productive.


Play is a lightweight, fast and highly scalable web development framework, with web friendly architecture and features (stateless, low resource consumption, reactive model based on Iteratee IO etc). So if you’re a Java/Scala developer, who want to develop cool web applications – then Play is a great choice for you.

Installing Play Framework

You must have Java installed (JDK 6 or later), read this tutorial on installing JDK in Ubuntu / Linux Mint if you haven’t already done that. When you’re done setting up java development kit, open a terminal and type javac to make sure everything is setup properly.

Download Play Framework

Download the latest version of Play (currently, it’s v2.1.0) and extract it to your Home Directory (it can be anywhere, but you should have write permission).

Set Path Variable for Play

Add the play to your path variable. Suppose, you have extracted the play framework to ~/packages/play-2.1.0 directory. Then open a terminal and type :

export PATH=$PATH:~/packages/play-2.1.0/

Now, if you type play at the terminal, you should have play command available.


Creating your first app

Now, you have successfully installed the play framework – Let’s create a simple application “TestApp” (it will simply say : “Hello Play”, not any useful, but you get an overview).

play new TestApp

Now, it will prompt for few questions (Application Name, Java/Scala etc), then move into the application directory and start the application.

cd TestApp

Now, you will have the play prompt, So you can run the application –

[TestApp]$ run

Open your browser and type the address http://localhost:9000, the default page should appear.


Now, open the file App/Controllers/ in your favorite text editor (Emacs, Vi, gedit etc) or IDE (geany, Eclipse etc) and replace the existing return line (in index method) with this :

return ok("Hello Play");

Now, visit the address http://localhost:9000 (or refresh if it’s slready loaded) and you should see the “Hello Play” greetings. Yeah! our first useless app is running :)


Recommended Resources For Further learning!


Now Steam is available in Ubuntu Software Center

Now Steam Client is available in Ubuntu Software Center (for 12.04/12.10/11.04/10.04). They had already announced the beta release few months ago, followed by new drivers from Nvidia. So, finally, Gaming is fun :) on Ubuntu/Linux!


Not all cool games are available for GNU/Linux platform, but it’s expected to grow fast :) – here is the list of cool games available for Linux. You can also try few games for free e.g Team Fortress 2.

steam in Ubuntu software-center

Note : There is 50-70% discount on all Steam for Linux games, until Feb 21.


Offline Dictionary Application for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

There are lot of dictionary application for Ubuntu / Linux Mint but most of them works only online. A lot of people prefer to have offline dictionary – because they can use it without any internet connectivity or may be because they have a slow Internet connection (which may results in slower look-up).


Goldendict : Advanced Dictionary software for Ubuntu!

Although, Goldendict has lots of features and many of them depends on Internet connectivity but you can easily install wordnet dictionary database to make it work offline.

Install Godendict on Ubuntu 12.04/12.10/ Linux Mint!

sudo apt-get install goldendict goldendict-wordnet

Goldendict has lot of cool features, you can easily customize the sources – add more local dictionary database, add websites (Urban Dictionary, Google Oxford and more!) for look-up, pronunciation support, and more!

Enable forvo pronunciation : Goldendict

Enable Pronunciation with Forvo

Go to Edit -> Dictionaries -> Forvo and enable it. You may have to register and get an API key (free plan is there, up to 500 requests/day) on Forvo.

plasma-tasks - KDE 4.10

KDE 4.10 is Released!

KDE 4.10 is released! It has lot cool new stuffs including the improvements in Plasma workspaces, new widgets built on Qt Quick, better stability, ease of use and performance. Now, the wallpaper engine is based on QML (easier to create and more secure).

plasma-tasks - KDE 4.10

New Features/Changes in KDE 4.10

  • faster and reliable Meta engine
  • improved File Manager (Dolphin)
  • new Print Manager
  • improved Plasma Workspace
  • new Air Theme
  • improvements in KWin Window Manager and Compositor
  • new appmenu

Read the official announcement for more details (about  the new features/improvements)

KDE Desktop is based on Qt framework, recently Qt has released v 5.0 with lot of amazing features – including 3D graphics, cross-platform portability and you can write cool apps with HTML 5 and Javascript.


Image to Text converter (OCR) for Ubuntu / Linux Mint

Tesseract is the best program for converting image to text, on Ubuntu/Linux. I’ve tried several OCR (Optical Character Recognition) applications but its accuracy is certainly higher than any other applications.

Tesseract is a simple and easy to use command line utility. It’s cross-platform application, and of course – it’s a free and open source software! You can supply various input formats and it can convert into 60+ languages.

Installing Tesseract in Ubuntu / Linux

sudo apt-get install tesseract-ocr

Further, you can install any language packages if required.

Now, before you start using Tesseract, you need to convert the files (png/jpg) to tif format (input format supported by tesseract). Use the following command (you may need to install imagemagick package) –

convert file_name.png out_file_name.tif

Now, you can try reading the content using Tesseract.

tesseract your_scanned_file.tif output_content

The results will be saved to output_content.txt file. If you want to OCR for other languages then pass it as the additional parameter, specified by -l. (and of course, you would have to first install that language pack)

e.g For scanning images that contains Hindi, Sanskrit text, you can use this command :

tesseract your_scanned_page.tif output_content -l hin

Visit official page for more details about the project.